A E I O

Mostly reblogs relating to science, books/reading, and photography. Sometimes some original content. I also blog about whiskey, my teenager, and my forties elsewhere. I'll share if you ask nicely.

Sep 15
whiskeyandmisanthropy:

Good friends & good whiskey.

whiskeyandmisanthropy:

Good friends & good whiskey.


Sep 14

YESTERDAY WHEN A GUY ASKED WHY I READ SO MUCH

dukeofbookingham:

I was like:

image

(via obscureliteraryreference)


From disorder, order.


troyholden:

Photographers forum on Sunday, September 21, 2 to 3pm. Join  Chris Beale, Brian Brophy, Reynaldo Cayetano Jr., Brandon Doran, Troy Holden, David Root, and Oscar Santos.
We’ll discuss a collection of candid photographs currently on display in the San Francisco Museum at the Mint.
The panel discussion will focus on the photographers’ thought process leading up to composing and exposing a photograph.
Hope to see you there!

troyholden:

Photographers forum on Sunday, September 21, 2 to 3pm. Join Chris Beale, Brian Brophy, Reynaldo Cayetano Jr., Brandon Doran, Troy Holden, David Root, and Oscar Santos.

We’ll discuss a collection of candid photographs currently on display in the San Francisco Museum at the Mint.

The panel discussion will focus on the photographers’ thought process leading up to composing and exposing a photograph.

Hope to see you there!


Sep 13
“Never apologize for burning too brightly or collapsing into yourself every night. That is how galaxies are made.” Tyler Kent White (via allwereallyneedisweed)

(via teachingliteracy)


crappytaxidermy:

An autobiographical mount titled “The Taxidermist Learns His Trade.” Well-executed, but could benefit from a tiny box of Borax IMHO.
via ebay, by seller deadgoodtaxidermy

crappytaxidermy:

An autobiographical mount titled “The Taxidermist Learns His Trade.” Well-executed, but could benefit from a tiny box of Borax IMHO.

via ebay, by seller deadgoodtaxidermy


evilsupplyco:

(Atomic Age radio host voice)
"Citizens are advised to know the location of, and route to, the nearest fallout shelter. Pamphlets and maps will be made available soon."

evilsupplyco:

(Atomic Age radio host voice)

"Citizens are advised to know the location of, and route to, the nearest fallout shelter. Pamphlets and maps will be made available soon."

(via evilsupplyco)


Sep 12

thedirtyoldgentleman:

mschaos:

candle-lighted:

rain appreciation post

please to be sending to California?

Seriously - we need this.

(via smellmyhead)


Sep 11
“I am learning to see. I don’t know why it is, but everything enters me more deeply and doesn’t stop where it once used to.” Rainer Maria Rilke  (via creatingaquietmind)

(via teachingliteracy)


artpropelled:

IMG_1274 (by Katie Griesar)

artpropelled:

IMG_1274 (by Katie Griesar)

(via smellmyhead)


libutron:

Basket Star - Astrocladus cf. euryale

Basket stars are a group of ophiuroids (Ophiuroidea - Euryalida - Gorgonocephalidae) in which the five arms are very branched. Most of them remain hidden during the day but come out at night, extending their arms into the water to trap food particles.

The Basket Star Astrocladus euryale (in the photos) is a species native to South Africa, whose arms are branched successively and are covered with pale spots. Sometimes this Basket star is commonly referred to as Gorgon’s Head.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Andrew Taylor | South Africa (2006-2007) | [Top] - [Middle] - [Bottom]

(via smellmyhead)


steampunktendencies:

Treehouse, Redmond, USA, by Steve Rondel http://goo.gl/B4RMuF

Steve Rondel’s children grew up before he could finish this exeptional treehouse. He started it 20 years ago when his oldest son was 5. Now he is looking for grandchildren to give him an excuse to push on.” 

(via smellmyhead)


skunkbear:

"What’d you do today Frank?"
"I built a dinosaur."
This is the skeleton of a Spinosaurus. It was a predator longer than the T. Rex … and it could swim. It lived in North Africa a hundred million years ago and mostly ate enormous fish.
The image comes National Geographic. You can get more info in the October edition of National Geographic magazine, watch National Geographic/NOVA special airing on PBS Nov. 5 at 9 p.m, or visit the exhibit at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, D.C., starting Sept. 12.

skunkbear:

"What’d you do today Frank?"

"I built a dinosaur."

This is the skeleton of a Spinosaurus. It was a predator longer than the T. Rex … and it could swim. It lived in North Africa a hundred million years ago and mostly ate enormous fish.

The image comes National Geographic. You can get more info in the October edition of National Geographic magazine, watch National Geographic/NOVA special airing on PBS Nov. 5 at 9 p.m, or visit the exhibit at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, D.C., starting Sept. 12.


amnhnyc:

A tabletop view in the Ichthyology collections area. Each jar and vial is filled with fish specimens from the research collection. Snapped by @samthecobra for #InsideAMNH.
Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

amnhnyc:

A tabletop view in the Ichthyology collections area. Each jar and vial is filled with fish specimens from the research collection. Snapped by @samthecobra for #InsideAMNH.

Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.


Sep 10

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